Our Metcheck Meteorology Book Club

October 23, 2020

Our Metcheck Meteorology Book Club

With many of our customers unable to travel as far afield as usual due to the Coronavirus pandemic, we thought we'd put together a few reading suggestions for the chillier months ahead, all with a meteorological focus of course!

Plus, we've got a copy of Oxford Weather and Climate Since 1767 by Stephen Burt & Tim Burt to give away to one lucky winner. To enter, simply email us at sales@metcheck.co.uk and tell us what aspect of the weather you've enjoyed observing over the last 6 months. Maybe you've had more time to take daily rainfall records in your garden, or perhaps you witnessed a spectacular summer storm. The winner will be chosen on Thursday 12th November 2020 and announced via Twitter. See terms and conditions below.

Oxford Weather and Climate Since 1767

Our book club starts off with this beautiful book by Stephen Burt & Time Burt which centres on the weather observations from the Radcliffe Observatory in Oxford. These records have been kept since 1772 and and form the longest meteorological records in the British Isles. In this book, expert analysis brings life to monthly and seasonal weather patterns: "From the prolonged frosts of January 1776 to the sparkling summer of 2018, this book celebrates Oxford's unique and priceless Georgian legacy by describing and explaining how the records were (and still are) made."

Of particular interest to the team here at Metcheck was the Oxford Climate Stripe (see below), showing the progression of annual temperatures from 1815 to 2018.

Rain or shine: Watching the weather for 250 years - BBC News

The Weathermen of Ben Nevis

This short book by Marjory Roy takes a fascinating look at the challenges of keeping weather records at altitude. Observation sites on the mountains of Scotland are rare due to the speed with which meteorological equipment can become iced up and it is these challenges which make the observations taken at Ben Nevis from 1883 to 1904 even more impressive! This book covers the trials, tribulations and personalities involved in this wonderful project which has gifted incredible climate insights to the world.

The Weather Observers Handbook

This book by Stephen Burt acts as a practical guide to gathering meteorological data, covering everything from how to set up your reporting station, to how to ensure accuracy. A must-have for home weather-watchers who plan to keep precise and timeless weather records.

"From amateur observers looking for help in choosing their first weather instruments on a tight budget to professional observers looking for a comprehensive and up-to-date guide covering World Meteorological Organization recommendations on observing methods and practices, all will welcome this handbook."

The Cloudspotter's Guide: The Science, History, and Culture of Clouds

Gavin Pretor-Pinney has created a book which has its heart in meteorology, but spans popular culture, literature, history and geography to consider all aspects or clouds. Described as a "smart, witty, and eclectic tour through the skies", this book is sure to put a smile on your face, in large part due to the beautiful photography and illustrations featured throughout. New to Gavin Pretor-Pinney and The Cloud Appreciation Society? His Ted Talk is a great place to start.

Terms and Conditions

Entries must be received by midnight GMT on Wednesday 11th November 2020. You will not receive an entry confirmation. Prize non-refundable and non-exchangeable. Winner will be chosen by Metcheck team and judges' decision is final. Prize can be delivered to a UK shipping address only. By entering you consent to being added to our Metcheck email mailing list. Runner's up will be emailed a free delivery code valid within the UK for metcheck.co.uk once the competition closes. You will then receive our regular email newsletters. You may unsubscribe at anytime. 





3 Responses

Mike Pedley
Mike Pedley

November 11, 2020

I’ve enjoyed not missing taking daily weather readings because I’ve been at home so much during the last 6 months!

Judy Greenwell
Judy Greenwell

November 11, 2020

This looks like a very interesting book! I have collected a few weather books over the years and they are always something you can go back to any time.

Michael Earl
Michael Earl

November 11, 2020

Hi,

Once lockdown started I and three of my former work colleagues who live locally set up a group enabling us to compare weather data on a daily basis. This means that we can see how the microclimate near our houses affects both temperature and rainfall, as well as enabling us to keep in touch.

Best wishes,

Mike.

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